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Author Topic: Being An Assembly Kid  (Read 21854 times)
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« Reply #15 on: January 30, 2005, 05:33:50 am »

Mark,

Great post.  

I agree wholeheartedly.  I think that almost everyone who was in the assembly would agree, minus a few.

All in all, it's a dead horse, but the carcass still moves a little when we beat it.

We should all remind ourselves that the biblical standard is two or three witnesses.  There a at least a hundred AK's who would totally back up what Scott is saying, not to mention their parents.

Ignoring this, even if there are exceptions, is nothing more than shutting one's eyes and ears to the truth.

Blind and deaf is the biblical term.

Yes, there were exceptions.  However, anyone who suggests that Assembly culture was even slightly different on major points is re-writing history.

I visited 12 gatherings, and they all felt the same, talked the same, had the same stuff on the table, etc.

They were a tight knit, highly controlled group.

Brent
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Mark C.
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« Reply #16 on: January 30, 2005, 10:37:38 pm »


All in all, it's a dead horse, but the carcass still moves a little when we beat it.

We should all remind ourselves that the biblical standard is two or three witnesses.  There a at least a hundred AK's who would totally back up what Scott is saying, not to mention their parents.

They were a tight knit, highly controlled group.

Brent

 Thanks Brent!

  I think that we could all forget the "dead horse" of what the Assembly was if it wasn't for the fact that some refuse to be honest with their recollections and if we were sure that this "carcass" wouldn't find new life via another GG supporter.

   Though to us the new look dead horse would be like the movie,"Weekend At Bernie's" (I think the title of the movie is something like that.  This guy dies and the plot revovles around the attempt to make the body look like it's living still Grin)  To the unsuspecting it might be an enticement to follow the deception.

   I was recently listening on the radio to a survivor of a Nazi death camp who was answering the question of why she continued to talk about what happened so long ago in Germany.

  Her answer:  "We must always keep it in our memory that people are capable of repeating these things again and that a lack of resistance by decent folks allowed these horriffic events to evolve into what they became."  In other words, there are subtle roots of evil even in present humanity, and if they are allowed to grow they can grow into a great evil if ignored.

   Though the Assembly was not Nazi Germany, and none were gassed to death, Jesus said much more about the dangers of false religion then he did about such monsters as Herod.

 Jesus and the NT writers became very alarmed concerning the spiritual damage one might receive from false teachers/practicioners of religion and if we as former victims of this don't sound the alarm who will?

Like it or not, it is our calling to try to warn and help God's people if we can.

                                                  God Bless,  Mark C.

                                           
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Oscar
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« Reply #17 on: January 31, 2005, 01:45:07 am »

Dear Verne,
  I suggest Brazillian jui jitzu. It is the best of all the self defence disciplines.   steve

"Best" depends on the circumstances.  I worked with a guy for years who studied Gracie Ju-Jitsu.  Having done some time in a Hakko Ryu dojo myself, we had many discussions and demonstrated "moves" to each other.

While they are really pro's at choking folks out, many of their holds could easily be defeated in a real fight if the other guy just stuck a finger in their eye.

Thomas Maddux
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vernecarty
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« Reply #18 on: January 31, 2005, 06:04:33 am »

Dear Verne,
  I suggest Brazillian jui jitzu. It is the best of all the self defence disciplines.   steve

"Best" depends on the circumstances.  I worked with a guy for years who studied Gracie Ju-Jitsu.  Having done some time in a Hakko Ryu dojo myself, we had many discussions and demonstrated "moves" to each other.

While they are really pro's at choking folks out, many of their holds could easily be defeated in a real fight if the other guy just stuck a finger in their eye.

Thomas Maddux

Gracie fighters have done reasonably well in full-contact meets Tom. They tend to do well against other trained martial artists. There was one meet that was a notable exception. Gracie (I don't remember which son) won but got pretty badly bloodied in the process.
He could not continue to the next round. Strange huh?
Danny Inosanto is still probably the best street guy alive...after all, isn't he supposed to be the only guy Bruce Lee taught the one inch punch?!  Smiley
Verne
« Last Edit: January 31, 2005, 06:08:11 am by VerneCarty » Logged
Oscar
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« Reply #19 on: January 31, 2005, 12:24:11 pm »

Verne,

I have seen a few of those "Ultimate Combat" meets on video.  I saw the one where the current Gracie big gun got hurt.

Now, it is obvious that the grapplers usually beat the punch/kickers in those meets.  Once the grappler gets hold of the karate guy, he's toast.

But....there are a few rules in those meets.  No attacks against your opponent's eyes is one of them.

My friend who studied this method described their in-house tournaments to me.  The approach each other, then one takes the other down, then they spend anywhere up to an hour wrapped around each other. (that would be enough to keep me out of the dojo  Grin )

The goal is to take advantage of every movement your opponent makes in order to advance your chokehold by 1/4 inch or more, until you finally can choke him unconcious.

Seems to me that in the real world the guy's friends might run up and kick you in the head.  Shocked  I guess if the other guy doesn't know this method, one can choke him faster.

I think the rapid-foot-movement-in-the-other-direction method would be the best to employ.  Wink

Thomas Maddux
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vernecarty
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« Reply #20 on: January 31, 2005, 01:38:15 pm »

Verne,

I have seen a few of those "Ultimate Combat" meets on video.  I saw the one where the current Gracie big gun got hurt.

Now, it is obvious that the grapplers usually beat the punch/kickers in those meets.  Once the grappler gets hold of the karate guy, he's toast.

But....there are a few rules in those meets.  No attacks against your opponent's eyes is one of them.

My friend who studied this method described their in-house tournaments to me.  The approach each other, then one takes the other down, then they spend anywhere up to an hour wrapped around each other. (that would be enough to keep me out of the dojo  Grin )

The goal is to take advantage of every movement your opponent makes in order to advance your chokehold by 1/4 inch or more, until you finally can choke him unconcious.

Seems to me that in the real world the guy's friends might run up and kick you in the head.  Shocked  I guess if the other guy doesn't know this method, one can choke him faster.

I think the rapid-foot-movement-in-the-other-direction method would be the best to employ.  Wink

Thomas Maddux
Yep. That's about the size of it. A lot of black belts don't understand the ultimate value of their skill is not in looking good but in surviving!
I believe in ending encounters very quickly over neatness of style and execution.
In some cases that definitely includes a strategic exit- most dancers would rather go out  in a blaze of glory... I could not agree with you more.
Verne
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Margaret
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« Reply #21 on: July 06, 2006, 10:29:02 pm »

On the topic of being an Assembly Kid:  A counsellor in the Southern California area is beginning a support group for 2nd generation people born or raised in cults. She led a support group for adult ex-Assembly people for several years, so she is knowledgeable about Assembly issues. Here is her invitation:

Hello,

I have received numerous requests to provide a support group for people who were born and raised in a closed, high demand, group or cult (also known as 2nd generation ex-members).  In response, I will begin facilitating a support group on June 18th, 2006.  The group will meet for two hours in the afternoon of the third Sunday of the month, at my office in Santa Monica.  The fee will be $20 per person; however, I am able to provide a sliding scale for hardship situations.  There is ample free parking available in the building.

In her article, “Born or Raised in High-Demand Groups: Developmental Considerations” published in the International Cultic Studies Association E-Newsletter, V. 4, No. 3, (08/2005), Leona Furnari, LCSW adapts Martin’s (1993) stages of recovery following cultic experiences to the experiences of children born and raised in closed, high demand, groups noting that there is no “pre-cult identity” to go back to.  The stages of recovery become:

Evaluation of the experiences - often in tandem with finding a support network, including any former members and/or extended family who have been on the outside; education on cults/mind control; therapy; reading; journaling

Reconciliation/Adaptation, Conciliation – moving slowly, taking small steps; explore redefining of terms; set small goals, tend to personal health; discover personal strengths

Integration – occurs over time

The support group is a vital element in the forming of new ideas about who we are and how we operate in our lives.  By interaction and interchange with others with whom we share a common experience, we can see that our problems and concerns are not unique.  In fact, they are often shared by others who may have developed ways of dealing with them that can be beneficial to us, and visa versa.   Support groups also are a place for the development of new ideas and solutions to problems.

The support group will be limited to a maximum of 10 participants.  Please contact me by June 14th if you would like to participate on June 18th.  Also, please feel free to forward this note along to anyone you feel would benefit from participation in the support group.

Mary Jo Cysewski, MA, LMFT
License #MFC 37891
P.O. Box 6366
Beverly Hills, CA 90212
310-963-4000
-----------------------------------

Here is a brief email correspondence I had with Mary Jo that further describes the nature of her 2nd Gen group:

Hello Mary Jo--
 
Thank you for inviting our 2nd generation members to this support group. I haven't been able to contact many yet. Unfortunately our own 3 adult kids are out of the area or unable to attend. But here is a sample response I got from someone:
 
"While I'm sure a support group like the one Mary Jo offers is helpful for some, I have found that one-on-one therapy has been most beneficial for me.... I have come to a place where I have done all the "re-hashing" I need to do. At this point, going back and re-visiting the pain would only hinder my forward progress."
 
I think that this is a common perception among us--that support groups are for re-hashing. I have never been part of one, but I would think that a support group for 2nd gen's would probably focus more on issues than re-hashing specific past events, and would cover current life challenges, like identity, social paranoia, self-confidence, etc. Would you care to comment on this?

----------------------------------

Hi Margaret,
 
Thanks for your reply.  You are correct, the support group for 2nd generation ex-members would be focusing more on current issues that have developed as a result of the limitations, trauma, etc. from being raised in a cult/high demand group.  There will be some structure and some specific topics, but also time to talk about whatever the participants need to talk about that day.  As a therapist with awareness of the cult/high demand group issues, as well as, standard clinical training regarding relationships, I am able to facilitate a more in-depth and focused conversation when appropriate.
 
I also agree with your responder... support groups are for support and, as such, are a good place to discover what personal experiences or issues would be better dealt with in individual therapy.  However, "re-hashing" is an important step in a process of healing, in that it allows the participant to begin to express, in a safe and supportive environment, his or her feelings about a painful and traumatic experience.  This actually helps the person to more clearly distinguish themselves from the group and begin to reclaim who they really are. [Editor's emphases]
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