AssemblyBoard
June 27, 2019, 03:00:36 pm *
The board has been closed to new content. It is available as a searchable archive only. This information will remain available indefinitely.

I can be reached at brian@tucker.name

For a repository of informational articles and current information on The Assembly, see http://www.geftakysassembly.com
 
   Home   Search  
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6
  Print  
Author Topic: Depression  (Read 46157 times)
lenore
Guest
« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2004, 10:38:38 am »

 :DJUNE 26: 1:27 AM.

AL: I DONT DISAGREE WITH WHAT YOU ARE SAYING.

BUT AS ONE WHO HAS SUFFERED FROM CLINICAL DEPRESSION DIAGNOSIS FOR THE LAST 10 YEARS, BUT SUFFERED FROM IT FOR THE LAST 30 YEARS.

THERE IS NO QUICK FIX FOR DEPRESSION.
DEPRESSION (MOOD DISORDER which is going to be called now), IS A VERY REAL MEDICAL CONDITION.

There are Biblical examples, if you read further,
like Elijah , his depression was not simply endured.
It was treated by rest and nutrition, and seeking God's presents.  It was ignored and endured.

There was King Hezekiah, in his depressive state due to his medical illnesses that was leading to death.
It wasnt ignored. Isaiah was sent to comfort him, and
his prayers were answered. God was there for him.

If you look at other examples, whether it was depression that afflicted Paul, he was apostle that if he suffered from depression, he had a lot of reasons.
But he wasnt alone, if you read of the letters, there was this one and that one visiting him, bring him news of the early church. The only time that he ever complained he was alone, was when he asked Timothy to come and visit him.

God doesnt leave us alone during our depressive state.
Depression is not just feeling sad or blue. It is a very real physical condition.
God send a earthly representative to help us, just like Elijah , had a angel to care for him. King Hezekiah had Isaiah, and Paul had the leaders of the early church.

The word depression is over used. But those who suffer Major Depression Disorder. Enduring sometimes is impossible to do alone.
You learn to cope, but sometimes you are in the black hole so deep, that  the light at the top is just a dimmer blinking.  Thats the place where there is no hope, hope is just a thread that is thinning and ready to snap.
That thinning thread is God.  The snap is our ability to hang on. Thank God he has his hand ready to reach down and grab us. God then uses his earthly respresentatives to bring comfort, bring contact, bring food, bring advocacy, bring support. even if it is just a listening ear and a should to cry on.

God does accompany us from the journey from Darkness to Sunshine.

Depression is an illnesses that should never be ignored, and needs proper diagnosis. and treatment, whether it is antidepression, therapy, change of thinking, fellowshipping, and prayer.
or and a combination of all of the above.



There are WEBSITES TO CHECK OUT:
 Roll Eyes www.camh.net
       www.macanxiety.com
          www.nimh.nih.gov
            www.emha.ca

These are mostly likely to be Canadian Web Sites, but
they are for sites that discuss mental health/illnesses such as depression, anxieties, .

Depression is a control condition, like diabetis which needs attention and management and is nothing to be ashamed of.
Responding to signs and symptoms as soon as possible increases chances of successfully managing your illnesses.

The life time risk for Major Depressive Disorder is 10 to 25% for women and from 5 to 12% for men.
Often begins in early childhood or adolescence,.

Depression has impact on most aspects of everyday life.

15% of patients with major Depressive Disorder die by suicide. It increases for those over 55 to 60%.
80% of all suicides are unintentional.

Depression leads to many other stress related illnesses due to lack or inability to care for self at times.

80 - 90% of individuals with Major Depressive Disorder also have anxiety symptoms., which can include major separation anxiety among older children.

These are just some of the facts. of 11 pages from this power point presentation I attended Wed. June 23rd.



Logged
al Hartman
Guest


Email
« Reply #31 on: June 27, 2004, 04:56:57 am »



Lenore,

     As a fellow sufferer, I am in no way demeaning the seriousness of depression, whatever the mental health pro's choose to call it.  It can be utterly devastating.  Please allow me a couple of comments in response to yours:



   ...God doesnt leave us alone during our depressive state.
Depression is not just feeling sad or blue. It is a very real physical condition...

   ...Enduring sometimes is impossible to do alone.
You learn to cope, but sometimes you are in the black hole so deep, that  the light at the top is just a dimmer blinking.  Thats the place where there is no hope, hope is just a thread that is thinning and ready to snap.
That thinning thread is God.  The snap is our ability to hang on. Thank God he has his hand ready to reach down and grab us.


     A coworker of mine used to describe his depressive state as the feeling of hanging by a single thread, above a fiery pit, and watching the strands of that thread break, one-by-one:     >ping<      >ping<      >ping<...     I understood what he was saying.  I have hung there in the oppressive darkness many times.

     The point of my previous post is that the non-Christian world, including its "specialists," sees no goal for the sufferer beyond eliminating the suffering.  But God has a greater purpose for us:  in all these things we are more than conquerors, so that whether by our living or by our dying, Jesus Christ may be exalted, not by our faithfulness to Him, but by His to us.  

     Regardless of how we feel, we can know that our Lord will never leave us nor forsake us.  We may feel lost, hopeless and alone, but at the same time we cling to His promise that underneath are (not the fiery pits of our hellish imagination, but) the everlasting arms.  God's hand is not only "ready to reach down and grab us," but His hand has never let go of us!

     Believe me, Sister, I KNOW how real the hopelessness of depression can seem, but it is still an illusion, brought on by chemical and/or environmental factors, while the truth in Christ Jesus is that I am His and His forever.  It is not "our ability to hang on" that matters, but His faithfulness to never let go!

God bless,
al





Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #32 on: June 27, 2004, 08:24:45 am »

JUNE 26, 11:11 PM

Dear Al  Smiley

I totally agree with you.

Even Christians, the deep pit of depression, can seem hopeless.

Fortunately, I have a wonderful Christian counsellor, who is also a licence pastor, and a licence counsellor.


Exploring one's pass to get at the root of the experiences, whether it is from childhood memories, enviroment, genes, chemical,.
You must admit that when the symptoms are very prevalent, and the ability to cope, or even think, just putting one foot against the other, becomes a human impossibility. The symptoms must be treated some how.
Whether it is through medication and therapy after all God has given people talents to do these things too.
Whether it is just talking it out, and acknowledging that
there is a problem. Give it a name.
There is still too much stigmatism associated with
Mental Health/Illness,  and that in itself can be a battle.
Christian who suffer from depression, has been told that all you have to do is buckle up, get on with it.
Those platitudes do not work, because  while under the depressional symptoms you are not really listening . and you want someone to listen to you.

You are right God doesnt leave us during these times, He is there with us.
During a depression episode, during that hopeless black hole, sometime unfortunately, God can only be a head knowledge,  when you need a earthly representative from God to lean on.
How many Christian's get to that hopeless state, and unintentional killed themselves because their hopeless state became unbearable, because  all they got were platitudes of buckle up, let it roll off your back, etc.
or even God is with you, God will carry you, those saying those words, doesnt do a thing .
To be fair, a lot of people do not understand about Depression, a lot people dont know how to help, and it something they dont even want to talk about.
The Christian community needed to talk about it.
There is a ministry out there to help each other, neighbours, etc.  to offer some kind of assistances to people experience depression. Maybe it has to start with over coming personal misconceptions of Depression.  I still hear "Its all in the head".

Al because you understand what it is and have learn to accept it as part of you, control it in the way your uniqueness. Not everyone is able to yet.
We are dealing, coping, surviving, learning, at our own level.
Not all of us is strong emotionally, even spiritually , relying on God through prayer, but I rely on God's earthly representatives  because without those
the lonilness will only add to the depression, then feeling of being alone becames the straw that breaks the camel's back.   Then thoughts of suicide , even begging to go to the heavenly home, because of the feelings of worthlessness, unwantedness, unloveness,
abandonment, rejection, etc. becames a very heavy burden to carry around.
God has allowed me to know my limits, God also has allowed others to know when I start withdrawning, isolating, disconnecting, because that is the sign that I
need more God's representatives to be his hand to hang on to.  That could be brothers and sisters in Lord, that could be animals with their unconditional love, that could be family, that could even be sitting out on the picnic table at 3 am, looking up at the stars, and being amazed at the beauty of God's creation.

Logged
al Hartman
Guest


Email
« Reply #33 on: June 28, 2004, 09:28:54 am »




Al because you understand what it is and have learn to accept it as part of you, control it in the way your uniqueness. Not everyone is able to yet.
We are dealing, coping, surviving, learning, at our own level.
Not all of us is strong emotionally, even spiritually , relying on God through prayer, but I rely on God's earthly representatives  because without those
the lonilness will only add to the depression, then feeling of being alone becames the straw that breaks the camel's back.   Then thoughts of suicide , even begging to go to the heavenly home, because of the feelings of worthlessness, unwantedness, unloveness,
abandonment, rejection, etc. becames a very heavy burden to carry around.
God has allowed me to know my limits, God also has allowed others to know when I start withdrawning, isolating, disconnecting, because that is the sign that I
need more God's representatives to be his hand to hang on to.  That could be brothers and sisters in Lord, that could be animals with their unconditional love, that could be family, that could even be sitting out on the picnic table at 3 am, looking up at the stars, and being amazed at the beauty of God's creation.


     Please let me clarify one very important point:  What I understand about my depression has nothing whatever to do with my ability to control or overcome it.  Learning about depression has helped me to accept it as a factual condition of my life.  I still have no control over it at all.  When it comes upon me, it is devastating and overwhelming.  I have no inner reserves of strength capable of confronting it.

     Paul said that when he was weak, then he was strong, for the Lord had told him that His (Christ's) strength was made perfect in Paul's weakness.

     Just as I have no control over the course of my affliction (it simply IS what it is), I also have no control over the truth of the Lord's promises:  They ARE what they are.  I can't make my depression seem any less than it feels, and even the prince of darkness can't make Jesus Christ's power of any less effect.

     We are all, each, different from one another, and God deals with each of us where we are.  His promises to us are the same for us all, but His ways of implementing them are tailored for our specific circumstances and comprehension.

     We who suffer attacks of depression must, between those incidents, strengthen ourselves through prayer and knowledge of God's word so that when the darkness next overwhelms us we will have paved the way for the Lord's intervention on our behalf.  Will He have made us more confident in Him?  Will He send someone to help?  Will we find consolation in the companionship of a faithful pet or the beauty of a sunset?  Will we even recognize the instrument of our deliverance?

     Each of us must answer these and other questions for ourselves, asking and trusting the Lord to help us to answer rightly and truly...

al


Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #34 on: July 07, 2004, 06:58:58 am »

 :DJULY 6TH 9:57 PM:

AL . You know I am glad I can have a emotional ping pong match with you.

You get at the heart of the matter.
Sometimes it takes time to sink in. But then there are times where facing the truth is not what a body wants to do at the time.

I have taken the last six days, to physically rest.
So my physically state could not further impede my mental state.

Today is my daughter Christie 24th birthday. I have not seen her since last October nor the grandsons either.
I didnt have the finances to send her a gift.
I was just about to wallow in self pity depression for a time.
You know what I did .  I send her 24 ecards for her birthday, on different ecard sites.
Picking out each different as if I was planning a birthday party, different aspects that are including in the party.
Doing that help me get out from myself, and it pick me up . Now I dont know what Christie going to say or do with all those ecards. But she cant say I didnt recognize her on her birthday.
Pray for me Al.

Depression, even though I have lived with this a long time. I am still trying to get a handle on it.
It is such a seesaw type of an illnesses, that even with medication to control the symptoms, you never know what and when you going down.
There are hints, like unable to stop the crying. The energy sapping. The I dont care about anything anymore blues.  Even the why am I still around, How useful am I really.  The claws of unworthiness, not good, loneliness start a scratching.
It is a battle . The only victor of that battle is the battle belong to the Lord.
Once in the depression cat fight. The only strength left is the strength of the Lord Jesus . It is only hanging on to Him that we can go through the battle.
You ever see the picture of the cat hanging on to a bar with one paw.  That Bar is Jesus. I am the cat hanging on by a paw.
It is crazy to picture this but sometimes that is the way it feels. Just hanging on by a claw.

thanks for the ping pong match. Are you keeping score or should I.  I believe it is your serve.

Gidday from the Valley & talk to you later.
Logged
moonflower2
Guest


Email
« Reply #35 on: July 12, 2004, 02:52:10 am »

I just wanted to add my 2 cents here.

I suffered from post-partum depression in varying degrees, depending on the type of delivery/surgery and stress and life-stressors that my body had to go through at the time.

Depression is not a "choice", like some would like to believe. It's a chemical imbalance. Many well-meaning folks would call me up to give suggestions on how to counter the state of depression, but it only added to the misery and feelings of guilt.

Fortunately, I had run into a doctor who suffered from bouts of depression and learned how to live in spite of them. I learned from him that your mind is a physical part of your physical body and depression can be linked to exhaustion (like in Elijah's case).

Praising God in the depths of depression can seem ludicrous, but I did it anyway, when I could. I learned that God was worthy of my praise because He was God, whether, at the time, I was convinced that He loved me and/or died for me, or not.

It was a valuable thing to learn: God was worthy of praise because He is God. It doesn't depend on anything of me. Even if He rejected me, He was still worthy of praise, because He was God!

Another thing I learned was that in depression, you can't "hang on". You've already lost the rope, but God is there. He hasn't left me just because I think that He has.

My heart goes out to anyone suffering from depression beyond the length of post-partum. It's a nightmarish experience.

Moonflower2

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death (depression), Thou art with me." Psalm 23

"If I make my bed (if my mind is) in hell, behold, You are there." Psalm 139. Jesus actually was in hell. Who better to know than He?
 
« Last Edit: July 12, 2004, 03:32:27 am by moonflower2 » Logged
al Hartman
Guest


Email
« Reply #36 on: July 15, 2004, 08:23:40 am »



I just wanted to add my 2 cents here.

I suffered from post-partum depression in varying degrees, depending on the type of delivery/surgery and stress and life-stressors that my body had to go through at the time.

Depression is not a "choice", like some would like to believe. It's a chemical imbalance. Many well-meaning folks would call me up to give suggestions on how to counter the state of depression, but it only added to the misery and feelings of guilt.

Fortunately, I had run into a doctor who suffered from bouts of depression and learned how to live in spite of them. I learned from him that your mind is a physical part of your physical body and depression can be linked to exhaustion (like in Elijah's case).

Praising God in the depths of depression can seem ludicrous, but I did it anyway, when I could. I learned that God was worthy of my praise because He was God, whether, at the time, I was convinced that He loved me and/or died for me, or not.

It was a valuable thing to learn: God was worthy of praise because He is God. It doesn't depend on anything of me. Even if He rejected me, He was still worthy of praise, because He was God!

Another thing I learned was that in depression, you can't "hang on". You've already lost the rope, but God is there. He hasn't left me just because I think that He has.

My heart goes out to anyone suffering from depression beyond the length of post-partum. It's a nightmarish experience.

Moonflower2

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death (depression), Thou art with me." Psalm 23

"If I make my bed (if my mind is) in hell, behold, You are there." Psalm 139. Jesus actually was in hell. Who better to know than He?
 

Moonflower2,

     Those two pennies are solid gold!  You really understand, and have made a contribution beyond value to anyone who suffers depression and will read your post.  Thank you!

al


Quote
  ...in depression, you can't "hang on". You've already lost the rope, but God is there.  He hasn't left me just because I think that He has.

"Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death (depression), Thou art with me." Psalm 23

"If I make my bed (if my mind is) in hell, behold, You are there." Psalm 139.  Jesus actually was in hell. Who better to know than He?
 


Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #37 on: July 19, 2004, 03:28:40 am »

 :DJULY 18: 6:37 PM: 'HAPPY LORD'S DAY'

I have been doing some web research on depression.
I want to organize the research and take them to my own physician.

But I have save a few of the information on Notepad.

I am giving you some of the information , I hope by sharing , someone can use it for themselves.

Lenore
------

 
WHAT IS DEPRESSION?

Depression has many faces, changing the way it appears from one person to the next. Compounding this problem is the fact that most people are unaware that depression is an illness. Also, many have a negative attitude toward mental illness and its treatment.

Depression is a troublesome and sometimes incapacitating condition that affects more than one million Canadians a year. People suffering from a depressive episode will often display a variety of physical symptoms. The depressed person may complain of a sad or blue mood. However, most people have symptoms not readily recognizable as depression, because they have never had a previous episode of depression.

Physical symptoms are most often the sole indicators of depression;
( headaches, vague muscle pains and bowel complaints are common presentations. )
For some people, physical symptoms are a way of gaining access to their doctor.
People often believe a depressed mood is their fault, a character weakness,
a sign of not being able to cope in society,
 and that they will be ridiculed by their doctor,
 whom they may view as an authority figure.
 Depressed patients may be afraid to say they are depressed and are apt to deny the diagnosis of depression.
 Such individuals need continued support before they feel comfortable enough to accept the diagnosis of a psychiatric illness and to comply with treatment.


This web site serves as an introduction to depression. Should you or someone that you are concerned about have any of the symptoms described in this web site, a health care professional should be contacted to assist you in evaluating these symptoms. No one needs to suffer from depression. The treatments described in this web site serve as information, but do not suggest that anyone should start self-treatment. Contact a medical professional to assist you.  


SYMPTOMS OF DEPRESSION


Anxiety:

A state in which the individual experiences feelings of uneasiness (apprehension) and activation of the autonomic nervous system in response to a vague, nonspecific threat.
 It is a common manifestation of depression, with up to 70% of individuals experiencing combined anxiety and depression.
 Anxiety symptoms can be very distressing to the individual, and may markedly affect his/her mood.

Situational Anxiety:

Actual or perceived threats to the concept of self, such as:
 Loss of status and prestige.
Lack of recognition from others.
Failure (or success).
Loss of valued possessions.
 
Actual or perceived loss of significant others:
Death; divorce; moving; temporary or permanent separation.

Actual or perceived threat to biological integrity:
 Dying; assault; invasive procedures; disease.

Actual or perceived change in environment:
Hospitalization; moving; retirement.

Actual or perceived change in socioeconomic status:
Unemployment; new job; promotion.

Transmission of another person's anxiety to the individual may also occur.

Defining Characteristics Of Anxiety

Physiological: Increased heart rate; elevated blood pressure, increased respiratory rate; excessive sweating; dilated pupils; voice tremors/pitch changes; tremors; palpitations; nausea and/or vomiting; insomnia; fatigue and weakness; flushing; dry mouth;
 body aches and pains; urinary frequency; restlessness; faintness;
paresthesias (eg numbness and/or tingling).
 




Emotional: Person states that he/she has feelings of apprehension; helplessness; nervousness; fear.
 Person exhibits irritability; angry outbursts; crying; tendency to blame others;
 lack of self-confidence; loss of control; tension or being "keyed up";
 criticism of self and others; withdrawal; lack of initiative; self-deprecation.  

Cognitive: Inability to concentrate; lack of awareness of surroundings; forgetfulness; rumination; orientation to the past rather than to the present or future;
blocking of thoughts (inability to remember).  
Anxiety differs from fear in that the anxious person cannot identify the threat. With fear, the threat can be identified. However, fear and anxiety can be present simultaneously in an individual.  

Disturbance of Sleep Pattern
The state in which the individual experiences, or is at risk of experiencing, a change in the quantity or quality of his rest pattern as related to his biologic and emotional needs. Sleep disturbances are common in depression and can be the individual's first complaint.
 One study estimates that as many as 80% of patients who suffer from depression experience frequent sleep disturbances
 Failure to treat this condition is a major cause of noncompliance with therapy.

Situational:
Related to Depression: Lack of exercise, anxiety response.
Life-style Disruptions: Occupational; emotional; social; financial.
Medications: Tranquilizers; sedatives; hypnotics; antidepressants; monoamine oxidase inhibitors; amphetamines; barbiturates.

Defining Characteristics:

Difficulty falling asleep or remaining asleep; fatigue on awakening or during the day; dozing during the day; agitation; mood alterations.

Mood: A prevailing emotional tone or feeling. Individuals with depression will often describe their mood as sad, hopeless, "down in the dumps" or empty. Often, the presence of depression can be deduced from a person's facial expressions and demeanour.  

Emotional: Increased irritability manifesting as persistent anger, angry outbursts or over-reaction to minor events. Loss of interest or pleasure in activities is almost always present to some degree. Lack of motivation, indifference and displayal of a pessimistic attitude are frequent. Concentration and memory problems are common, and some patients may worry that they have Alzheimer's disease.
 
Social Withdrawal: Those suffering from depression tend to avoid interactions with family and friends.
Sexual Dysfunction: The state in which an individual experiences, or is at risk of experiencing, a change in sexual health or sexual function that is viewed as unrewarding or inadequate.  

Suicidal Risk: When the diagnosis of depression is suspected,
a person's suicide risk must be assessed. It is a sobering statistic that 10 to 15% of hospitalized depressed patients will eventually commit suicide.  
 

Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #38 on: July 20, 2004, 07:59:01 am »

 Smiley: July 19th: 11:06 pm:

The information I am sharing tonight is on

Clinical Depression and Women:
-----------------------------------------

Clinical Depression in Women

Clinical depression is not a "normal" part of being a woman
 
One in five women can expect to develop clinical depression during their lifetime. Regardless of age, race, or income - clinical depression can occur in any woman, and can be serious enough to lead to suicide.

Many people understand that clinical depression causes sadness and withdrawal.
 But depression can also cause anxiety, irritability, fatigue and changes in eating and sleeping habits.
 Depressed people often feel worthless or hopeless, and may experience physical symptoms as well, including chronic pain.


Women are more than twice as likely as men to experience clinical depression. Although all the reasons for this difference are not known, research suggests that biological differences in women - such as hormonal changes and genetics - may contribute to depression. Additionally, social reasons, such as greater stresses from work and family responsibilities, the roles and expectations of women, and even the increased rates of sexual abuse and poverty among women may lead to higher rates of clinical depression.


Despite the number of women who experience clinical depression, it is, in fact, not a "female weakness" or simply a normal part of being a woman. The good news is that clinical depression is a very treatable medical illness. Women with clinical depression need to know that successful treatments are available.


Clinical depression is more than the blues

Clinical depression is more than "the blues," which we all experience now and then. It is normal to feel sadness or upset at times of the death of a loved one, from a divorce and in times of illness. Too much work or troubles at home can be stressful. But, most women can go through these difficult times without becoming clinically depressed.

Some people incorrectly believe that only those who have experienced depression for months, or who have completely lost their ability to function, have clinical depression.
 In fact, when the symptoms of depression last more than two weeks, or when the symptoms are severe enough to interfere with daily life, you may have clinical depression.


Does this sound like you?

"All the joy had gone out of life. Everything seemed like such a burden: my family, my job. I lost interest in eating, in being with my friends, even in having sex."  
"I just couldn't concentrate anymore, and everyone noticed how irritable I was. Maybe it was because I was so tired, but I couldn't sleep - I kept waking up so early."  
" I felt so miserable, and felt sure I would feel this way forever. I thought my family would probably be better off without me."  


Not every woman experiences clinical depression in the same way. Different women have different symptoms.


 Why do women suffer from clinical depression more often than men?



While we do not know all the reasons for this, research indicates the following:

Adolescence - The higher incidence of depression in women begins in adolescence, when there are dramatic changes in roles and expectations for teenage girls, along with physical and hormonal changes.

Adulthood - Many women face a variety of stresses, such as major responsibilities at home and work, a greater likelihood of being a single parent, and caring for children and aging parents. Rates of depression are highest for women when they are unhappily married. Being unmarried, including being separated or divorced, increases depression in both women and men.

Menstruation and Premenstrual Syndrome - While many women experience irritability or depressed feelings before their menstrual period, caused by changes in hormone levels, these feelings usually last only a few days. Extreme emotional and physical symptoms are called premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and may benefit from treatment by a doctor.

Postpartum Depression - Many women experience sadness following childbirth, ranging from a few days of the "blues" to clinical depression. Although as many as one out of every ten new mothers experience serious depression, in most cases it passes in a week or two. However, long-lasting clinical depression in a mother can have a negative effect on a child's behavior and development, which is another very important reason to seek treatment.

Menopause - Women are at no greater risk for clinical depression during menopause than at other times in their lives. However, women who have a history of clinical depression may be more likely to experience a recurrence during menopause.

Late Life - Some factors in later life can increase the risk of clinical depression. The death of a spouse may lead to depression. Additionally, clinical depression can be triggered by other illnesses including heart disease, cancer, diabetes and arthritis. Called "co-occurring depression," it should be treated in addition to treatment for the other illnesses. Depression is never a normal part of growing older.

How these factors affect women is not yet fully understood. Regardless of the reasons, depression is not a normal part of a woman's life.


Clinical Depression and Women
 
Women experience depression at roughly twice the rate of men. One in five women can expect to develop clinical depression during their lifetime. Regardless of age, race, or income clinical depression can occur in any woman, and can be serious enough to lead to suicide. The good news is that clinical depression is a treatable medical illness. Women with clinical depression need to know that successful treatments are available.


The Facts Every Woman Should Know


Approximately seven million women in the United States currently have diagnosable clinical depression.i
Only one out of every three women who experience clinical depression will ever seek care.ii
Married women have higher rates of depression than unmarried women, with rates peaking during the childbearing years.iii
Depression occurs most frequently in women 25-44 years of age.iv
Girls entering puberty are twice as prone to depression as boys.
Elderly women experience depression more often than elderly men.v
Depression is the number one cause of disability in women.vi
Research shows a strong relationship between eating disorders and depression.vii
Almost 15% of those suffering from severe depression will commit suicide.viii


Why Are Women At Increased Risk For Depression?


Biological differences in women may contribute to depression, such as hormonal changes and genetics.ix
Social reasons may also lead to higher rates of clinical depression among women, such as greater stresses from work and family responsibilities, the roles and expectations of women, and even the increased rates of sexual abuse and poverty.x


Women's Attitudes Towards Depression

According to a recent National Mental Health Association Survey on the public's attitudes and beliefs about clinical depression:


More than one-half of women surveyed believe it is "normal" for a woman to be depressed during menopause.
More than one-half of women surveyed believe depression is a normal part of aging.
Many women do not seek treatment for depression because they are embarrassed or in denial about being depressed.
More than one-half of women surveyed cited denial as a barrier to treatment.
41% of women surveyed cited embarrassment or shame as barriers to treatment.xi


Learn to recognize the symptoms of clinical depression

No two people experience clinical depression in the same manner. Symptoms will vary in severity and duration among different people. See your doctor* if you experience five or more of the following symptoms for more than two weeks:


Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" mood
Sleeping too little, early morning awakening, or sleeping too much
Reduced appetite and/or weight loss, or increased appetite and weight gain
Loss of interest in activities once enjoyed, including sex
Restlessness, irritability
Persistent physical symptoms that don't respond to treatment (such as headaches, chronic pain or digestive disorders)
Difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions
Fatigue or loss of energy
Feeling guilty, hopeless or worthless
Thoughts of suicide or death
* As a first step, a thorough physical examination may be recommended to rule out other illnesses.  

Help Is Available NMHA Campaign for America's Mental Health 1-800-969-6642
National Mental Health Association 1-800-969-NMHA
DEPRESSION/Awareness, Recognition
and Treatment Program (D/ART),
The National Institute of Mental Health  1-800-421-4211
National Depressive and Manic Depressive Association 1-800-82-NDMDA


i American Psychological Association, 1990.
ii National Mental Health Association Survey 1996.
iii Commonwealth Fund Briefing Note 1997
iv Mryna Weissman, Ph.D., Archives of General Psychiatry 1984 Volume 41.
v National Institute of Mental Health, 1996
vi The World Health Organization, 1990
vii Willcox, M. Stattler, DN. "The relationship between eating disorders and depression." The Journal of Social Psychology, v. 136, n.2; p. 269. April 1996.
viii American Psychiatric Association. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Washington DC: American Psychiatric Association, 1994.
ix National Institute of Mental Health/D/ART, "Depression: What Every Woman Should Know." 1997
x National Institute of Mental Health/D/ART, "Depression: What Every Woman Should Know." 1997
xi National Mental Health Association Survey 1996.
 

(c) 2004 National
www.nmha.org/ccd/support/factsheet.women.cfm


Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #39 on: July 22, 2004, 08:11:09 am »

 Smiley:July 21st: at 11:11 pm

What depression is

Depression can be called a disease of the emotions. It's classification as a mental illness does not make it any less real or painful. It is a common disease and at any time, around one in twenty people will be suffering from it.
Depression is a disturbance in mood characterised by varying degrees of sadness, disappointment, loneliness, hopelessness, self-doubt, and guilt. These feelings can be quite intense and last for a long period of time. Daily activities may become more difficult... but the individual may still be able to cope with them. It is at this level, however, that feelings of hopelessness can become so intense that suicide may seem the only solution.

A person experiencing severe depression may experience extreme fluctuations in moods or even a desire for complete withdrawal from daily routine and/or the outside world. Depression is nothing to be ashamed of, and is not a sign of weakness. It is treatable, whether by medication, by therapy and counselling, or both. God answers prayer, and persistent prayer facilitates the process of emotional healing.

For the depressed Christian whose world has fallen apart, prayer may not seem like an option. In this case, the persistent prayer of close friends or relatives will help.

What depression is not

Depression is not "Just in your mind." It isn't a made-up illness, it isn't laziness, or a couple of days of feeling sad or blue. It isn't PMT, or stress. It is not rejection by God, or abandonment. If it is from God, as a result of a specific sin (i.e. refusal to end an adulterous affair), you will know it. You will not be left wondering.

Some causes of depression
(This is not a complete list, there are other causes)

Physical Causes:
Pre-menstrual and postnatal hormone changes
Some types of manic depression have been shown to have a genetic basis
Hormone deficiencies (such as thyroid disturbances)
Generalised illnesses such as kidney or liver disease
Lack of natural light during winter in some susceptible people
Alcoholism
Drug dependency
Food allergies and strange reactions to medicines, chemicals or food additives.
Mental Causes:
Unconscious impulses (from Freudian and Jungian psychology)
Learning the wrong way to cope with difficulties
Learned helplessness (from behaviouristic psychology)
Overload or stress
Spiritual Causes:
(most likely in NON Christians) Sense of despair/futility of life; death of a loved one.

Symptoms

Lethargy (everything seems just too much trouble to do)
disturbed sleep (early waking, difficulty getting to sleep)
waking up tired after a "normal" night of sleep)
lack of concentration
irritability
exhaustion
lack of sexual drive
sensation of utter despair
sense of hopelessness or uselessness of everything
fear of death
phobias
obsessional behaviour
permanent sense of anxiety
feelings of wanting to cry, but inability to do so
thoughts of suicide, or fear of committing suicide
change in appetite and weight
other symptoms, this is not a definitive list

Likely effects of depression in Christians
John Lockley says:

In Christians, spiritual effects follow from the depression, and seldom the other way round. I repeat - in Christians, nearly always the depression comes first, followed by a sense of remoteness from God, rather than depression being the result of "falling away.

"A Practical Workbook for the Depressed Christian,"
 
Being a Christian does not offer immunity from trials, troubles or illness.

God is making us holy and perfect, and this may involve dealing with your past. It is not an overnight process, and it may be painful. We may have leftover baggage of hurts suffered, wrong attitudes, incorrect information and so on. This can slow us down, and can be a source of depression.

You do not have to feel guilty about being depressed. It is not a sin to doubt what you have been told (this is what everyone does before they become a Christian, and God loved them then too), and the doubting process of can build a strong foundation for you to re-build on later.


To the information



Bible Studies
There are a number of studies planned for this location, including character studies on Jonah and Elijah.

Book Study: Nehemiah

Chapter One
Chapter Two

 Book Study: James

Chapter One verses 1 to 4
Chapter One verses 5 to 8
Chapter One verses 9 to 18

 
Book Study: One John Chapter Two

Verses 15 to 17
Verses 18 to 28

 Lessons on Leadership  

THE CHRISTIAN DEPRESSED PAGES
www.gospelcom.net
 



Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #40 on: August 01, 2004, 03:39:41 am »

 :)GOOD EVENING ON JULY 31ST AT 6:47 PM , HERE IN BEAUTIFUL ARNPRIOR, ONTARIO. CANADA.
Here is another installment of my web research on depression.
++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Depression linked to low self-esteem in girls
Canadian Press

TORONTO &#8212; Low self-esteem in teenagers is more likely to lead to depression later in life for girls than for boys, according to a Statistics Canada report released Wednesday.

"Girls who have weak self-concept during adolescence have a higher chance of being depressed in the next six years," said the study's author Jungwee Park. "Those girls also have higher odds of being obese." While low self-concept in boys may lead to physical inactivity and obesity, Park said there wasn't a significant link with depression.

"The only common ground is obesity," Park said of the findings, which suggest a sharp divide in how boys and girls carry feelings of inadequacy into their adult lives.

"It doesn't mean boys are doing the right thing or getting through unscathed, they're just doing different things," said psychologist Dr. David Wolfe.

Teen girls are more inclined to internalize feelings of distress while boys are more likely to take it out on others, said Wolfe. And those coping mechanisms are largely dependent on gender stereotypes forced on teens.

"That's an extremely significant developmental period, and gender rigidity becomes very powerful," Wolfe said from his University of Western Ontario office in London, Ont.

A countrywide study conducted in 1994-95 of teens ages 12 to 19 defined self-concept as a combination of two variables, self-esteem and the extent to which teens feel in control of their lives.

That study found that girls' self-concept tended to be lower than that of boys.

Six years later, the same 1,100 respondents were TAB Quizzed on perceptions of their overall health to determine the effects of self-concept.

Depression stood out as the most alarming consequence of low self-concept among girls who had not reported symptoms of depression in 1994-95. Perceptions of overall health also suffered among young women who reported low self-concept in the earlier study.

"Somehow girls are getting different messages than boys," said Wolfe, who offers sports as an example of how teens are made to conform to rigid codes of behaviour.

Wolfe points to data that shows girls often drop athletics in adolescence while boys improve their social standing by playing sports. Such rules of behaviour can take a toll on kids' self-esteem.

"It's very tough for these kids to navigate," he said.

That's where parents can help.

The Statistics Canada study, entitled Adolescent Self-Concept and Health Into Adulthood, found that emotional support from family members was a positive influence on self-image and health for both boys and girls.

It also suggests that strong self-concept, especially among girls, was a key factor in developing good mental and physical health.

Wolfe says giving a teen the freedom to navigate adolescence while providing support and understanding is key.

It's also important to let the teen be who they are instead of trying to shape them into who you want them to be. Authoritarian parents run the risk of creating the stereotypical moody, distant adolescent.

"Parents are there to remind teens that they'll get through this and be supportive in terms of maintaining their sense of self," said Wolfe.

"It's OK to be who you are."

Psychologist Dr. David Wolfe offers parents these tips on building healthy relationships with their teenagers:

Be honest and open. Talk to your teens about dating and sexuality.
Be authoritative but not authoritarian in your parenting style.
Think harm reduction, not zero tolerance, when it comes to experimentation with adult privileges (substance use, sex, romance, etc.).
Don't believe everything you read or hear about teen behaviour and actions.
Monitor and supervise your teen's activities while respecting their privacy.
Try to initiate positive communication with your teenager whenever the opportunity arises.
Encourage your teen to be involved in extracurricular activities.
Encourage flexibility in gender roles and behaviour. Speak to them about the pressure to conform to peer expectations.


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
I hope this research has been of help.

Talk to you later

Lenore
Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #41 on: August 06, 2004, 08:08:56 am »

 Smiley: Good evening from Arnprior, Ontario. Canada on August 5th, at 11:07 pm.

I have joined a group called Mood Disorder Peer Support Group.  It is a new group in town, only about 5 weeks old.
It is for anyone who suffers from depression, for what ever reason, to come and be part of a support group.

There is a circle , where a small teddy bear is passed around. The person who  has the bear, is the one talking, the person can pass, talk to the bear, or floor, or to someone. They can say anything they want. The ideas is to let the group know how your week was, and what you maybe experiencing or feeling.  This takes quite a bit of time, as our group have gone up to 14 participants.
Then it is a break. Tonight someone with a guitar just played , while coffee and munchie and outdoor breaks occur.
Then there is a joke time, discussion time, learning time of different aspects of depression. Before we go home for the night there is a time of singing.
Everythings spoken is confidential. We cant even tell who is attending the meeting.
For as many people who attend, there are as many stories, and reasons, different stages on the road to recovery.

There are Christian there, and non christian alike, but most agree that it is a higher power that keeps them going.
Christianity is rarely mention, unless it is someones choice to mention it as a life line, but it is not pushed.

Nobody does anything that make them uncomfortable.

I believe as word of mouth keeps spreading, this group is going to be a good group. I prefer it to remain small, but there are so many people who can benefit from a group like this that is structure, yet not.

It is also for families of people who suffer from depression to also come, to help the family to understand, what depression is, and why their loved one suffers the way they do.

Each person attending must sign a confidentiality form.

A box of Kleenx goes around with the teddy bear.

My own personal story was an up and down week in regards to my own depression.
So I am still struggling with this disorder, and a cataylze was a factor from 18 months ago, that required another round of inner battles with me, as well as an external one with this person, who is family.

So in my personal experience, that talking and bringing depression out in the open, and joining a group of like minded people for support, is a good thing.
And when that group makes it fun as well as being a place of safety to discuss some vunerable issues. It is a very positive healing step.

All in all, tonight was a good night.



Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #42 on: August 13, 2004, 07:52:32 am »

 :)AUGUST 12 AT 11:01 PM.
                            My next installement of web research of the topic of depression.


............................Major Depression
................................Symptoms

A person who suffers from a major depressive disorder must either have a depressed mood or a loss of interest or pleasure in daily activities consistently for at least a 2 week period.
 This mood must represent a change from the person's normal mood; social, occupational, educational or other important functioning must also be negatively impaired by the change in mood.

 A depressed mood caused by substances (such as drugs, alcohol, medications) is not considered a major depressive disorder, nor is one which is caused by a general medical condition.
 Major depressive disorder cannot be diagnosed if a person has a history of manic, hypomanic, or mixed episodes (e.g., a bipolar disorder) or if the depressed mood is better accounted for by schizoaffective disorder and is not superimposed on schizophrenia, a delusion or psychotic disorder.

...............This disorder is characterized by the presence of the majority of these symptoms:


.......depressed mood most of the day, nearly every day, as indicated by either subjective report (e.g., feels sad or empty) or observation made by others (e.g., appears tearful). (In children and adolescents, this may be characterized as an irritable mood.)

.....markedly diminished interest or pleasure in all, or almost all, activities most of the day, nearly every day

.....significant weight loss when not dieting or weight gain (e.g., a change of more than 5% of body weight in a month), or decrease or increase in appetite nearly every day.

.....insomnia or hypersomnia nearly every day

......psychomotor agitation or retardation nearly every day

......fatigue or loss of energy nearly every day

.......feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt nearly every day

.........diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness, nearly every day

.....recurrent thoughts of death (not just fear of dying), recurrent suicidal ideation without a specific plan, or a suicide attempt or a specific plan for committing suicide

The symptoms are not better accounted for by bereavement, i.e., after the loss of a loved one, the symptoms persist for longer than 2 months or are characterized by marked functional impairment, morbid preoccupation with worthlessness, suicidal ideation, psychotic symptoms, or psychomotor retardation.

...........Criteria summarized from:
American Psychiatric Association. (1994). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders, fourth edition. Washington, DC: American Psychiatric Association


Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #43 on: August 27, 2004, 10:12:51 am »

 ???August 27th at 1:22 am Arnprior time.

The next installment of my web research of Depression.
If I repeat forgive me, and if any have any other research they would like to add.

God Bless you all who struggle with Depression.
=============================


Types Of Depression


Depression always involves a noticeable change in mood. In fact, many mood disorders include depression as a key part. Sadness is part of the experience, but the word "depression" usually implies a profound gloom that goes beyond ordinary unhappiness.
 A depressed person may become irritable or stop taking pleasure in everyday activities. People with mood disorders are also likely to have other problems, such as changes in appetite, sleep or energy.
 (Some medical conditions can also lead to these changes, so it is important that you work with your health-care provider to identify the problem.)


Some [mood disorders ]that include depression as part of the picture include:


Major Depression
Dysthymia
Bipolar Disorder
Cyclothymia
Seasonal Affective Disorder


                            Major Depression


The key feature of major depression is at least one extended period (at least two weeks) of very low mood, called a major depressive episode. In addition to low mood, there are typically many other symptoms, such as insomnia, fatigue, weight loss, poor concentration and feelings of worthlessness or guilt.



                                  Dysthymia


Dysthymia, also called dysthymic disorder, shares the same features of major depression. However, in dysthymia, the low mood and other symptoms are less intense than those in a major depressive episode, but they last longer - at least two years in adults and one year in children and teen-agers.




                              Bipolar Disorder


A person with bipolar disorder has had at least one manic or mixed episode - an extended period (at least one week) of high, expansive or elated mood - the opposite of major depression. A person in a manic state feels energetic and active, has little need for sleep and may behave recklessly and overoptimistically. A person in a mixed state has symptoms of both a major depressive and a manic episode that occur alternately, or sometimes the symptoms overlap in confusing ways.




                         Cyclothymia


Just as dysthymia is a less severe version of major depression, cyclothymia, or cyclothymic disorder, is a less severe but often longer lasting version of bipolar disorder. A person with cyclothymia has periods of both high and low mood - never as severe as either major depression or mania - over a period of at least two years.






                Seasonal Affective Disorder


Seasonal affective disorder is characterized by moods that shift with the seasons. The most common pattern is a decrease in mood in the fall or winter (as days get shorter) and an improvement in mood in the spring. However, a few people have the opposite pattern, with depression in the summer.





www.intelihealth.com


Logged
lenore
Guest
« Reply #44 on: October 14, 2004, 09:28:16 am »

 Cry October 14 at 12:34 am Arnrpior

I am amazed at times how quickly depressive moods can hit.
There are times when you think you can handle anything life can throw your way, you can get encouraging support.
THe next day your crying buckets, because what the mind preceives of maybe an innocent remarks of others, can seem like a burden to you. The burden can be you dont deserve to be happy, your not worthy of  the encouragement and support,  God is wasting his love on me.  You wait for the other shoe to drop.
THe mind and emotions become a jumbo of thoughts, and lies, that you begin to believe in. You begin to feel attacked, degraded, taking things personal.
You want to crawl into bed with the covers up and not come out.
You make excuses not to be involve in anything, you hide, push people away, oh you want people around, but you keep them at arms length.  
Even as a women, hormones play a factor. Taking different medications can play around with the dosages and effectiveness of  medication that controls the depression.

As a person who lives with Chronic Depression. I experience all of the above and more.
Today was a low day after a high day yesterday. The other shoe dropped.
Crying releases a hormone that help alleviate the depression.

Also sharing the experience is helpful not only to self, but to other suffers. Because the feeling of I am Alone in this, becomes I am not alone, others understand.

Thanks for the release.

Lenore
Logged
Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 6
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.11 | SMF © 2006-2009, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!