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Author Topic: disneyland  (Read 12637 times)
doug
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« on: September 12, 2008, 07:22:31 am »

I got a job with Disney and I was in the tower of terror when they were doing shaft test-runs early in the morning.
I know this doens't have any thing to do with anything spiritual but I was intrigued by the experience.
Also, I go to the Disney Christian fellowship and I will be (probably) in an upcoming issue of the Calvary Chapel quartrely magazine.
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Oscar
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« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2008, 09:00:01 pm »

Doug,

Do you know Mark Nynabor (sp)?

Tom Maddux
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Joe Sperling
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« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2008, 10:55:43 pm »

Doug--you said below:
"Also, I go to the Disney Christian fellowship"

I heard they have a habit there of altering scripture just a bit. Here is one example:

Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as Snow White; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool. (Isaiah 1:18)

just kidding.  Wink
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outdeep
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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2008, 01:40:24 am »

The name Disney Christian Fellowship reminds me of the 1970's when there was a popular Charismatic church by Disneyland called Melodyland.  They apparently took over an entertainment venue.  It was run by Ralph Wilkerson and had a theology school that Dr. Walter Martin taught at.  I've never been.   Apparently it was torn down in 2003 to make room for more Disney stuff.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melodyland
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doug
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« Reply #4 on: September 16, 2008, 08:10:51 am »

melodyland is long gone. It is now the gardenwalk. Either that or a cast member parking lot. btw disney is installing a little mermaid ride and a beer garden.

Mark Neynaber. Yes I know him and have had the privilige of praying with him. btw hannah montana is having her sweet-16 b-day party next month. the tickets run at $250.

also, i saw minnie without her head.

has anyone read the tipping point?
« Last Edit: September 16, 2008, 08:18:05 am by doug » Logged
doug
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« Reply #5 on: October 19, 2008, 12:14:08 am »

I went on a backstage tour of muppets 3d. the lead engineer showed me and another guy around the inner workings of muppets. the projectors and all the electronics. it was very interesting and the complexity of the operation as well as 3d projection in general is very impressive. we'll probably go on the catwalk and see the internals of the tower of terror next. btw i am among the tiny handful of people  allowed to see this part of the park.

we get told a lot of stuff.

i'm learning how to keep secrets.

has anyone read the shack?
« Last Edit: October 21, 2008, 02:14:01 am by doug » Logged
Oscar
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« Reply #6 on: October 19, 2008, 12:29:25 am »

Doug,

I read it.  Entertaining, but not so hot in the theology department.

Tom M.
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Margaret
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« Reply #7 on: October 19, 2008, 04:47:45 am »

I did too. Aside from theology issues, the book has been helpful to some FAM's, mainly because the view of God's character is totally different from the Ass'y (remember Tamilla's article, "A God Unlike the Assembly god" - http://www.geftakysassembly.com/Articles/AssemblyTeachingPractice/AssemblyGod.htm).
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outdeep
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« Reply #8 on: October 20, 2008, 06:21:09 am »

Some folks insisted that I read it and I made it half way. Frankly, I got board with it because it is so poorly written.  I really dislike the wise person/flunky conversation type of writing.

The one thing that it does present worth considering is this:  why is it that the church it not meeting the deep pain of people that when a poorly written book presenting an Aunt Jemimah God hits the scene, it so strongly meets this deep thirst in people?  Is it the church is not doing its job?  Is it that the typical Christian is like the guy on the book who nominally attends Sunday morning (with no personal spirituality and community involvement) and then blames the church for not meeting his need when a crisis hits?

By the way, when Aunt Jemimah explained that the reason that the Bible portrays God as Father is because back then they needed a father but now God is using a different metaphor because that is what you need, I wrote this insightful comment in the margin of the book:  Huh?
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Margaret
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« Reply #9 on: October 20, 2008, 08:13:39 am »

Well, in regard to the church question, most of the FAMs I'm in touch with aren't really connected in a church. Some attend, with great reservations and not a few triggers, but most don't. So they're not getting much new input about God from church, even if it's right there.
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Oscar
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« Reply #10 on: October 20, 2008, 09:10:41 pm »

Folks,

Many years ago, I had to work late. It was back to school night or whatever.  For whatever reason, the family had had Colonel Sanders chicken for supper that night.

So, when I got home, I ate my share of the chicken at, say....9:00pm.  I spent most of the night getting up to puke out my guts...a result of that meal.

Then, in 1988 Betty's weird ideas about food resulted in most of the folks at the worker's convention in Colorado getting sick as dogs.  We had been fed poorly refrigerated chicken that had been brought from Illinois in camping coolers!!!  Food poisoning on steroids.   Betty, of course, said it was the "flu".  Some people had to check into motels while trying to get home just to have immediate access to a toilet.

The point???  I have not given up eating chicken.  It is a good source of protein.

The assembly experience was horrible.  Believe me, I know.  To let the bad experience of the assembly poison you against healthy Christianity is to continue the same fuzzy thinking that kept us in the assembly so long. 

God gave us our minds to think with.  If we use our emotions to do our thinking, as we did in the assembly years, we will just continue to live unprofitably and unwisely.

Tom Maddux
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Explorer
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« Reply #11 on: October 20, 2008, 11:13:36 pm »

Hi Tom,

The point you bring up here is a really good one. However, I had the same experience years ago with tomato soup (except it was flu that was the probable cause) but I have never really got over it. I could eat the stuff, but it still does not have the appeal.

Getting back on the horse and riding it is a really good principle, but not always an easy one to follow. Probably harder for some than others, depending upon personality, their amount of involvement and Im sure lots of other factors.

So the sincere question is, what are some of the steps one might take to get over it?
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outdeep
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« Reply #12 on: October 21, 2008, 12:08:36 am »

When I posed the questions below, I wasn't thinking just of people burned by the Assembly.  I was talking about the average Christian in general who seems to have a pent-up dam of pain and emptiness suppressed and ignored and poorly-constructed The Shack suddenly became that relief they were looking for all their lives.  Why is that?

I think the problem is both the person and the church.  The main character in the Shack is the typical church goer who seems content to attend Sunday morning but has no community life, no buddy in their life they can share on any meaningful level, and no real spirituality beyond Sunday morning hymns.  On the other hand, the church today seems drawn towards the idea of "the bigger the better" where the large group worship and teaching is set forth as the "main thing" and meaningful relationships and community is sort of an optional add-on accessory. 

Many times I have sat in a large worship service listing to an expertly crafted, doctrinally correct sermon and left thinking.  "Ok, I believe that.  So what?  What difference does that really make?"

However, may other times, I would sit in a recovery group with folks honestly pouring out their struggles and feel strongly that God spoke though an individual giving me direction and encouragement on how to face my struggle.

I guess I am in a place in my life where I put more stock in a small group of honest, struggling Christians meeting in a musty basement over a talented worship team and dynamic preacher teaching in a beautiful auditorium.  I realize this isn't either-or.  We need both the large group and the small. I think we would do well in correcting this imbalance, however.

I think Tom is right.  The individual may have been poisoned by the chicken, but the only way to get going again is to try.  Doing nothing is not going to help.  On the other hand, I think one needs to move towards the small, safe gathering of honest folks (people who are willing to talk about their sin in present tense, not just past tense) in addition to the nice Sunday service.
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Mark C.
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« Reply #13 on: October 22, 2008, 05:18:25 am »

Getting back on the horse and riding it is a really good principle, but not always an easy one to follow. Probably harder for some than others, depending upon personality, their amount of involvement and Im sure lots of other factors.

So the sincere question is, what are some of the steps one might take to get over it?


  I find myself in agreement with you again Explorer (I hope this doesn't give you a bad reputation on the BB  Wink).

  Judging what others do to "get over it" based only on how "I" have handled the situation doesn't consider the complexity of the human soul---- something the NT takes great pains to teach us.

  Soldiers in war (a very intense situation), who survive and come home, can have many different responses as a result of severe emotional trauma.  During the Vietnam war era sometimes I would get picked up while hitchhiking by army guys on leave.  Some of these guys would laugh about "shooting Gooks" and not seem to be traumatized at all, and others (like when the guy I was riding with through a tunnel who freaked out at the sound of a backfire by yelling, "sniper, sniper!!!!!!"  I had to grab the wheel and pull the car over for the guy), are super sensitive and unable to control their very strong emotions.

  My point is, if you, like some of us have, wake up in a sweat after having a nightmare how are you supposed to control such feelings of emotion via the exercise of a strong will that is dedicated to thinking correctly?  It would be easy to despise such an individual as someone who allows his emotion to control him, but I think it might be, as Explorer put it, better to ask a more sincere question: where is this needy person and how can I help him?

  Re. this question of "intensity" and going to church:  -----Returning to the "bad chicken" analogy---- what if you had that bad chicken experience several times a week for two decades instead of just twice in twenty years?  Every Assm. meeting you went to had the toxic affect of making you feel guilty for not measuring up to a perfect standard, continually causing you to turn inward with a deep feeling of self loathing? 

  This kind of intensity led to suicide, depression, rejection of your faith due to failure, the loss of what was once your close intimate friends, etc.  Eating twenty years of this kind of chicken would guarantee that no matter how much you tried to train your thinking you would be unable to eat anything that even looked like chicken again!  I am constantly amazed that any former members have been able to hold onto their faith!

  I believe it's okay to choose a path that you feel comfortable with and not think that you must join up with some organized church group again.  Paul spent fourteen years alone in the desert for a season at God's direction and maybe he needed that after eating the group dinners of bad chicken that he ate as a Pharisee? Wink  God prepared him away from a group so that his contribution ended up being much more valuable than it would have otherwise.

  An answer for some may be a small group, for some immersion in theological study, or maybe getting some good individual counselling.  Changing our thinking about God is most certainly the right goal, but for a deeply wounded soul mind over matter alone may not be enough.  For such maybe it would be better to sit down in those green pastures of PS 23 and just let God's grace wash over your soul---- No meetings to go to, no religious performances, nobody evaluating my life---- just the knowledge that God loves me and has done all that needs to be done!

                                                                God Bless,  Mark C.     

   
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outdeep
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« Reply #14 on: October 23, 2008, 05:13:52 am »

I can't speak for others but I doubt if anyone is saying "just try again and go to a large church just like I did and get over it".  I think the point of the bad chicken analogy (as opposed to the funky chicken dance which is also bad) is that to get better, we have to do something.  You are right that that something may be attending a church or a Sunday school.  It may be a recovery group.  It may be a group of friends you trust.  It may be individual counseling. 

One may be so traumatized that they feel they want to isolate, withdrawl, and have nothing to do with groups again.  They can't bring themselves to trust a group again.  That is certainly understandable.  However, that won't change the fact that in doing so, they won't get better.  Recovery is not for those who need it but for those who want it as the AA saying goes.

My sponsor told me a saying today:  We are not responsible for the abuse that happened to us (or the resulting addiction, depression, etc.), but we are responsible for our recovery.
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